The Curious Incident Of The Dog In The Night-Time by Mark Haddon

Tuesday, June 13, 2017

 

"I think prime numbers are like life. They are very logical but you could never work out the rules, even if you spent all your time thinking about them." Christopher - The Curious Incident Of The Dog In The Night-Time by Mark Haddon

 

Greetings fellow bibliophiles! As you may know I started these book recommendations on my Instagram. But now that I have my very own shiny new website (Excited tween Squeal!) I can go into a little more detail from here on out. Yay, more babbling for me. Ahem! and by babbling I mean very serious discussions on very important topics of course, It's all very grown up. Ahem! My Life In Books is not by any means a book review or critique, the aim is simply to recommend books that I have loved and to tell you a little bit about why I enjoyed them so much and why you may too. I prefer to talk about the things I love, rather than complain about the things I don't. To each their own is my philosophy. So here we go.

 

This book was one of those instant classics. I first read it about ten years ago, maybe even more...time is weird. Is it just me or as you get older does time start to get a bit trippy? Like things you could have sworn that happened just a couple of years ago, end up being an entire decade ago. Terrifying! Any-who back to the book. I reread this one recently and fell in love with it all over again. It was originally published in 2003 by a very talented British author by the name of Mark Haddon. I believe its title is some kind of reference to Sherlock Holmes as this book is very much a good old fashioned murder mystery. 

 

The story centres on a 15 year old boy named Christopher John Francis Boone (bit of a mouthful.) Christopher belongs somewhere on the Autism spectrum, although interestingly in rereading this book I realised his exact condition is never actually specified. I guess that isn't really the point, what is important is that it is a story which celebrates being different, and therefor anyone can relate and enjoy. Christopher's unique view of the world gives this book a very refreshing and distinct style and narration.  

 

The story begins as all good murder mysteries do...with a murder.

In this case the victim is the neighbors dog, Wellington. Christopher finds the canines remains, it appears to have been speared by a garden fork (poor puppy.) His neighbor, the dogs owner, Mrs Shears, wrongfully accuses Chris of killing Wellington and rings the police. Things spiral from there and adventure and mayhem ensue. Christopher takes it upon himself to unravel the mystery of Wellingtons death. In order to solve the case he begins recording everything in a book which he calls Murder Mystery Novel. His mathematical genius aid him in his hunt, but his social anxiety and people skills are an obvious obstacle. Taking on the role of detective means Christopher is going to have to leave his comfort zone and venture out into the big noisy world and interact with all sorts of people and stimuli that he simply isn't used to. Although at first overwhelmed, his determination to find truth, justice and all that is right, push him through. However once this mystery is solved, and the case is closed, an even bigger one is opened. Christopher's whole life as he knows it is about to change (I'm not including any spoilers, but man is it juicy.) 

 

This book is deeply compelling, it is funny and inspiring and the mystery element keeps you turning those pages so fast, you're on the last one before you know it. Christopher's perspective is both fascinating and moving. It is a thrilling mystery with buckets of heart. A must read. That is it for this week my friends. Until next time, may your days be filled with Peace, Love & Poetry. 

 

"I like dogs. You always know what a dog is thinking. It has four moods. Happy, sad, cross and concentrating. Also, dogs are faithful and they do not tell lies because they cannot talk."

 

  

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©2017 by Daniel Devenney.